Pedigree of a Vandercook Press

Below are some photos of how my new Vandercook Universal III was carefully crated and shipped from the fine arts press of Stephen F. Austin State University. It arrives this Friday.

It is a fragile piece of equipment, and the man I am working with to bring it out here has provided me with detailed instructions for how to carefully remove it from the freight truck to the storage facility. I am nervous about protecting this press until it makes it to its new home in the studio in late August. I will be going for more training with Vandercooks at the SF Center for the Book later this month, and then will be able to practice over the summer until I can work on this beautiful press.

Below is a description from the LaNana Creek Press catalogue. I don’t know know where the Vandercook came from before this, but I hope I can continue to use it to produce limited, fine press editions. I have never met Professor Charles Jones, the Director and Printer who used this press in his studio, but I have read about his work online. I am grateful to have the opportunity to care for and work on this press, and I will reach out to him to let him know that his Vandercook will be cared for with respect.

The LaNana Creek Press (LCP) was founded in 1998 as the fine arts press of Stephen F. Austin State University, with Charles D. Jones as Director and Printer and Dr. David A. Lewis as Editor with the purpose of continuing the legacy of finely hand-crafted books using alternative and traditional letterpress printing & binding methods in combination with original printmaking processes to produce limited edition books in the fine press tradition. Each year, the Press publishes one or two major books and produces a number of less ambitious publications. LCP has established a reputation for innovation and quality. Its books may be found in such important rare book collections as the Bodleian Library, Oxford University, the Victoria & Albert Library, The Harry Ransom Center, the National Library of Taiwan as well as many Special Collections Libraries through out the United States.

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